Using Solid Fuels In A Smoke-Controlled Area

Hello all, as I’m sure you are aware London is governed by ‘The Clean Air Acts of 1956 and 1968’ which were acts introduced to England in the 1950s and ‘60s in the wake of the widespread burning of coal in domestic heating and by industry. These smogs were blamed for the premature deaths of hundreds of people in the UK and the Acts gave local authorities the power to control emissions of all manner of dark smoke, grit, dust and fumes from industrial premises and furnaces. Consequently, most of London is governed by these rules which is why here at London Gases we only supply Smokeless coal and briquettes. To check if you live within a smoke-controlled area, go to:

http://www.uksmokecontrolareas.co.uk/locations.php?map_name=lond

Also, you can check if your appliance is exempt from these regulations by going to:

http://uksmokecontrolareas.co.uk/appliances.php?country=e

An "exempt" appliance is one that is suitable for burning unauthorised fuels in smoke control areas, under Regulations published under the Clean Air Act.

If you wish to burn logs and you live in a smoke controlled area, you may only do so if you use an "exempt" appliance; as, under the Clean Air Act 1993, wood is not an authorised fuel. However, many of the stoves for sale in the UK meet the standard required because according to the Solid Fuel Association they use a system of secondary combustion, which means they burn off or 'eat' their own smoke. Burning logs is considered carbon neutral because the log absorbs CO2 during its lifetime and this balances with the CO2 emitted during combustion.

Using Solid Fuels In A Smoke-controlled Area

Posted 01.04.14